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Numbers on the Parachute Industry & the Sport of Skydiving
by Dan Poynter, D-454.
http://parapub.com/parachute/

Here are some interesting facts and figures about the parachute/skydiving industry. For statistics on the Book Publishing industry, see http://parapub.com/getpage.cfm?file=statistics/index.html. and for the Professional Speaking industry, see http://parapub.com/statistics/speakstats.cfm

Updated March 2008.

Some statistics conflict with others. They are not our numbers; we are just repeating them. Check the sources to verify veracity. Some statistics are dated; they are the latest we could find. Historical numbers can be compared with current ones to forecast trends. Figures are for the United States unless otherwise noted.

Sources are noted when known. Many of the statistics reference web sites or email addresses. These are the people and organizations that originally published the information. The statistic is not necessarily on the referenced site. Contact the person or organization through the email address or web site for more information on the number.

Before quoting a statistic, it is recommended that you contact the source and verify the number. We may have misinterpreted the data. The sites usually have far more information on the industry than what we quoted. Acquire background information including how the statistics were obtained.

You may repeat any of these numbers as long as you cite http://parapub.com/statistics/ and the reference, if noted, as the sources. Remember, without this Document, you would not have found the statistic.

There are two basic categories to these numbers:
A. Parachute Suppliers – Manufacturers and Parts Providers
B. Skydivers – Parachute Users

A. Parachute Suppliers – Manufacturers and Parts Providers

2000: Since their first major deployment in 1942, parachutes have been an important tool in the arsenal of the United States’ armed forces, enabling the delivery of troops and equipment to inaccessible locations
with speed and often with surprise. Following the initial use of parachutes in World War II for large-scale troop deployments, the technology evolved rapidly to support a broad range of “aerial delivery
systems” for cargo and other payloads. The technological and manufacturing base of the air delivery systems used by the armed forces is now many decades old and is well established. The U.S. military relies on these systems not only in times of conflict, but also for assisting in humanitarian relief operations around the globe.

The industry consists largely of parachute manufacturers and suppliers of components used in various air delivery systems. Cargo and personnel parachutes are the main products of the aerial delivery industry, but manufacturers also produce special skids, pallets, and shock absorbing systems for delivering products to the ground intact.

There is also a commercial side of the market--the civilian sportparachute market. There are substantial differences between defense-- the larger market--and commercial business sectors. Commercial
parachute customers demand wide choices of styles and colors. The manufacturers use very small production runs and are adept at making one or very few of a specific item. Military parachute manufacturers, in contrast, typically have larger production runs of several hundred to over a thousand of a particular parachute system. Although there are at least 16 manufacturers of parachutes in the United States, five defensedevoted parachute companies produce the majority of completed aerial delivery goods (as measured by gross sales) for the U.S. military, according to BIS survey data. These manufacturers have dominated the defense cargo and personnel markets for years. These “Big Five” firms are engaged in what has been described by industry officials as “cutthroat” competition.

--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry. http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Industry structure
The U.S. parachute-manufacturing industry is focused on two markets – military needs, which account for most of the volume and sales; and civilian sport parachutes. The industry is also divided in another way:

1. Manufacturers of parachutes; and
2. Suppliers of parachute materials and components.

The parachute industry consists of manufacturers and suppliers of parts
such as tape, thread, hardware, webbing, cloth and other component
parts. Sales may be direct to the (military or civilian) customer or may
pass through wholesalers and/or dealers to the buyer.

The military often buys high-performance parachutes, designed for the
sport, off-the-shelf.

Domestic sales for manufacturers of cargo & personnel military parachutes
1996: $46.5 million
1997: $55.5 million
1998: $48.0 million
1999: $45.8 million
2000: $43.4 million. Plus foreign purchases of $15.1 million.

The Big Five manufacturers (Irvin, Mills & Pioneer are the Big Three).
• FXC Corporation/Guardian Parachute – Santa Ana, CA
• Irvin Aerospace – Hope Mills, NC and Santa Ana, CA
• Mills Manufacturing Corporation – Asheville, NC
• Para-Flite, Inc. – Pennsauken, NJ
• Pioneer Aerospace Corporation – South Windsor, CT and Columbia, MS

1997: $54.3 million
2000: $41.7 million
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry. http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

U.S. Army parachute inventory
2002: 103,000+ cargo parachutes in stock at Army depots valued at $31.6 million. (Some have been there since the 1950s; the designs have not changed). 175,000 (est) cargo and personnel parachutes are located in the field at military installations in the United States and at U.S. bases around the world. The average cost of these parachutes is $2,246.

Inventory levels for main personnel parachutes were at or near zero.

Approximately 20,750 emergency reserve parachute units were held in depots. These parachutes were valued at $17.6 million and have an average cost of $848 a unit.

--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry. http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Parachute manufacturing capabilities
2000: there are seven+ manufacturers of military cargo and/or personnelparachutes in the United States
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry. http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Government purchasers
2000: Eight agencies purchase most of the parachutes: Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine, Corp, Forest Service, NASA, etc.
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry. http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Military parachute life cycles
2000: Personnel parachutes have a determined service life (a maximum shelf life) without use of 16.5 years, and every personnel parachute is stamped with a manufacturing date that starts its life-cycle clock. A personnel parachute is also stamped with the date that it is first placed in service (PIS). From that point on, a parachute’s service life cannot exceed 12 years.
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry. http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Component suppliers to military parachute manufacturers
Components make up 25% to 50% of the revenue generated by the finished product.
2000:
5 textile
13 hardware and part
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry. http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Civilian (sport) parachute manufacturing
The sport parachute market is about one-third of the military market.
Survey of 13 of the sport manufacturers.
1996: $13.6 million domestic, $2.9 million foreign
1997: $19.8 million domestic, $3.4 million foreign
1998: $18.3 million domestic, $3.5 million foreign
1999: $16.0 million domestic, $3.1 million foreign
2000: $18.7 million domestic, $2.8 million foreign
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry.
http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Component suppliers to civilian parachute manufacturers
1996: $5.6 million domestic, $.25 million foreign
1997: $5.5 million domestic, $.33 million foreign
1998: $5.0 million domestic, $.33 million foreign
1999: $5.2 million domestic, $.29 million foreign
2000: $5.7 million domestic, $.34 million foreign
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry.
http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Manufacturer profitability
(15 manufacturers)
1996-2000: $5.1 million on sales of $81 million.
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry.
http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Parachute Industry Employment
The Big Five employed 69% of the workers.
1996: 1,330
1997: 1,411
1998: 1,327
1999: 1,245
2000: 1,274
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry.
http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

2004: Survey of 67 member-firms attending September meeting.
The 67 companies employ 43,175 people worldwide.
--Membership Committee, Karen Dean, info@SSKinc.com

Capital investment in plant and machinery
Annual average: $1,125,195
From $500 to $1,100 per employee

1996: $997,172
1997: $1,617,657
1998: $1,222,124
1999: $1,163,078
2000: $625,944
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry.
http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

R&D spending by military manufacturers
For 15 companies (gross industry sales of $79 million).
1996: $641,440
1997: $907,000
1998: $1,023,000
1999: $1,145,000
2000: $1,461,330
$3.2 million in federal R&D grants were awarded annually to a few manufacturers over the survey’s five-year period.
DOD also provided funding for research, development, testing, and evaluation (RDT&E) activity for aerial delivery systems including parachutes, increasing from about $3.8 million in 1996 to nearly $13 million in 2000.
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry.
http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

Nylon production
Nylon 6,6 is produced by DuPont three to four times a year in response to customer demand.
--NSA Assessment of the U.S. Aerial Delivery Equipment Industry.
http://www.bis.doc.gov/defenseindustrialbaseprograms/OSIES/ DefMarketResearchRpts/Air_Delivery_Final_May26-04_MAC_PrintFinal.pdf

2005: Price Watch on nylon filament yarn. See
http://www.yarnsandfibers.com/index.php3

U.S. Army Soldier Systems Center — Natick, Massachusetts.
Employees: 1,957
  Civilian: 1048
  Military: 159
  Contractors: 750
SSC has 124 buildings located on 174 acres. The main campus is 78 acres.
Combined annual budget: $1.2 billion.
-- Soldier Systems Center
http://www.natick.army.mil/

Parachute Industry Association
Founding members, 1977.
(Originally the PEIA: Parachute Equipment Industry Association)
    Altitude Shop, Jerry Meyers
    Chute Shop, John Higgins
    D.J. Associates, Don Beck
    Greene Star Systems, Alan Godfrey
    Joe Smith Parachute Sales & Service
    The Jump Shack, Mike Johnston
    Lincoln Parachute Loft, Shorty Janousek
    McElfish Parachute Service, Jerry Roulliard
    Mid-Ohio Parachute, Dick Paoliello
    National Parachute Supply, Ron Edwards
    Para-Flite, Inc. Dick Morgan
    Para-Gear Equipment Co. Gary Lewis
    Para-Innovators, Hank Asciutto
    Relative Workshop, Bill Booth
    Jose Rodriguez Parachute Systems
    Strong Enterprises, Ted Strong

2004: Survey of 67 member-firms attending September meeting.
31 had skydivers on staff.
    They totaled 41,013 jumps
--Membership Committee, Karen Dean, info@SSKinc.com
2005: 219 - Number of member firms.
--Parachute Industry Association
http://PIA.com

Parachute Museum
See http://ParachuteMuseum.org/

2007: Land paid off.

Equipment
    Automatic activation devices
1990: Development of the Cypres ADD took four years at a cost of $850,000. 12 generations of the units were produced. 130 units were produced for the final field test; none of them were sold.
--Airtec GmbH Safety Systems
http://www.cypres.cc/Sites/englisch/Frameset_engl_background.htm

1991-2005: Airtec has sold 80,000 Cypres AADs
--Airtec GmbH Safety Systems
http://www.cypres.cc/Sites/englisch/Frameset_engl_background.htm

2005: Airtec has 35 employees
--Airtec GmbH Safety Systems
http://www.cypres.cc/Sites/englisch/Frameset_engl_background.htm

International Parachute Symposium
The Parachute Industry Association host conventions with educational programs and exhibits. See http://www.PIA.com

Symposium 2008 was held in Barcelona.
    First Symposium in Europe
    Third PIA meeting outside the U.S.
    2008 Symposium turnout: 455
        Full Registration (all days): 222
        Day passes (Single days): 63
        Exhibits only: 170
    Countries represented: 25

    Co-Located Meetings
    Skydiving Museum meeting
    Performance Designs dealer meeting
    UUPT Dealer Meeting
    Sunpath Products dealer meeting
    AERAZUR/Parachutes de France meeting
    Strong Enterprises dealer meeting
    Airborne Systems meeting
    European Association of Safety Parachutes
    Parachutes de France
    Airtec dealer meeting

1999-2007 symposium figures were
    Countries: 33, 44, 35, 31, 22
        37 States
    Paying attendees: 497, 580, 860, 800, ???
    Exhibit one-day passes: 295 , 420, 380, 300,
    Total Attendance: 1100, 100, 1240, 1180, 1037
    Booth spaces: ???, 121, 18, 138, 231, 46
    Exhibitors: ??, 58, 64, 72, 116, 35
    Speakers: ??, 82, 42, 74, 64, 16,
    Hotel room nights: ????, 2800, 2453, 2432, 3571

B. Skydivers – Parachute Users

Number of skydivers
USPA membership. (Nearly all regular skydivers are members)
1991: 20,250
1992: 26,150
1993: 25,550
1994: 27,750
1995: 30,000
1996: 32,900
1997: 32,665
1998: 33,526
1999: 33,458
2000: 34,217

2005: 34,000
--United States Parachute Association, http://www.USPA.org

Where skydivers live
2001: United States
12% are in the Western Conference (Southern California, Arizona and Southern Nevada).
11% are in the Eastern Conference: (NY, NJ, DE, MD and DC)
10% are in the Southeast Conference. (GA and FL).
2002:
12.2% Western Conference
11% Eastern Conference
10.6% Southeast Conference
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/images/memsurvey01.pdf

Other sports skydivers engage in
2001:
11.4% Snow skiing
10.7% SCUBA diving
6.3% Motorcycling
6.1% Flying

2002:
10.8% Snow skiing
9.4% SCUBA diving
6.1% Snowboarding
5.9% Motorcycling
5.6% flying
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/images/memsurvey01.pdf

What skydivers do (vocation)
1997:
4.2% Professional
.5% Agriculture
3.7% Retail/Craft
13.5% Manager
20.9% Empl.
20.5% Student
21.7% Military
--Véloce Parachutism
http://www.veloce-skydive.com/ffp/uk.stats.html

2001:
9.7% engineers
8.1% military
7.6% Building trades
7.2% Business Management
6.8% Computer industry

2002:
10.1% Military
9% Business management
7.9% Building trades
7% Computer industry
6.8% Engineers
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/images/memsurvey01.pdf

Age of Skydivers
2001:
33.9%: 30-39
25.6%: 40-49
21.1%: 0-29

2002:
33.7%: 30-39
26%: 40-49
20.3%: 0-29
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/images/memsurvey01.pdf

Gender of skydivers
2001:
83.7% male
14.9% female

2002:
84.1% male
15.1% female
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/images/memsurvey01.pdf

Type of jumping skydivers prefer

1997:
46.4% formation skydiving
3% Freeflying
9.3% freestyle
8.2% Canopy formation
17.9% Style & Accuracy
--Véloce Parachutism
http://www.veloce-skydive.com/ffp/uk.stats.html

2001:
46.4% formation skydiving
17.6% Freeflying
8.3% freestyle
5.5% Canopy formation
5.2% Style & Accuracy

2002:
45% formation skydiving
19.2% Freeflying
7.8% freestyle
5.9% Canopy formation
5% Style & Accuracy
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/images/memsurvey01.pdf

Number of parachute centers (Drop Zones)

2005: There are 306 dropzones worldwide. 252 in the U.S.
--The Skydivers Enclave
http://www.enclave.com/links/pages/World_Drop_Zones/

2004: There are 77 dropzones in Australia
--Australian Parachute Federation
http://www.apf.asn.au/apf_clubs/dzs.asp#South%20Queensland%20Parachute%20Council

2005: There are 24 dropzones in New Zealand
--New Zealand Parachute Federation
http://www.nzpf.org/

2005: There are 24 dropzones in Great Britain.
--British Parachute Association
http://www.bpa.org.uk/dropzone/dzone.htm

2005: 250 USPA Group Member "drop zones," or parachute jumping
businesses
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/uspa.htm#uspa

2005: There are 54 drop zones in Canada.
--Canadian Sport Parachuting Association
http://www.buckler.ca/cspa/grouplist.las

2005: There are 756 dropzones worldwide.
--Dropzone.com
http://www.dropzone.com/dropzone/

National Parachuting Organizations
2005: There are 14 national parachuting associations.
--Internationa Parachute Commission, FAI.
http://start.fai.org/para-federations.asp?lang=en

United States Parachute Association (USPA) has 22 elected directors; 14 regional and 8 national..
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/uspa.htm#uspa

Number of jumps
2000: The USPA membership reported making 2,244,165 jumps
2001: The USPA membership reported making 2,215,995 jumps
2002: The USPA membership reported making 2,151,228 jumps

2001:
21.3% have made 0-25 jumps
33% have made 26-250 jumps
45.7% have made more than 250 jumps

2002:
19.8% have made 0-25 jumps
33.5% have made 26-250 jumps
46.7% have made more than 250 jumps
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/images/memsurvey01.pdf

Skydiving fatalities
It is more dangerous to drive to the airport than to skydive at the DZ, only if you live a long way from the airport.

Most accidents occur to experienced skydivers exceeding their limits.

Fatalities v jumps. Divide the number of jumps/year (above) by the number of fatalities to get the chances of a fatality. E.g., 2002: 2,151,228 jumps ÷ 33 = one fatality for every 65,188 jumps.

Fatalities v skydivers. Divide the number of jumps/year (above) by the number of jumpers to get the chances of a fatality. E.g., 2000: 2,244,165 jumpers ÷ 34,217 = one fatality for every 65,586 USPA member.

2004: 68 fatalities worldwide.
Dropzone.com
http://www.dropzone.com/fatalities/2004/index.shtml

United States
1992 - 27
1993 - 41
1994 - 30
1995 - 27
1996 - 39
1997 - 31
1998 – 44
1999 – 27
2000 – 32
2001 – 35
2002 – 33
2003 – 25
2004 – 21
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/page2/relative_safety.htm

For worldwide stats, see
http://www.dropzone.com/fatalities/
http://www.skydivingfatalities.info/

1991: Global research on safety in parachuting 1991. Replies from 35 countries of 62 were received. 26 had exact counts, nine had only estimated numbers.

Total of 245 162 jumpers made 4 848 025 jumps. 74 died, which makes 1 fatality per 65 513 jumps. Preliminary research gives ratio of 1:64 091 for year 1992.

Experienced jumpers (over 250 jumps), who cover 24% of all jumpers, made half of all jumps, but were involved only in 35% of accidents.

Students cover 48% of all jumpers, but they made only 17% of jumps,
and were involved in 38% of accidents.

Human error was cause of 92% of fatalities. Approximately 75% of
victims would have been saved with AAD. RSL/Stevens system might
have saved 35%. If all jumpers had used both AAD and RSL, amount of
victims might have decreased from 74 to 20.

In 75% of accidents, the reserve hadn't been used at all or it had been
used too low.
--FAI/IPC Techical and Safety Subcommittee Congress
Helsinki, Finland, October 1993
http://www.afn.org/skydive/sta/stats.html

Skydiving injuries
2002: 1,275 USPA members reported having injuries requiring medical
attention
--United States Parachute Association
http://www.uspa.org/about/page2/relative_safety.htm

Improve your odds

Stay away from collapsible pilot chutes (especially those that require cocking), elliptical main canopies, 500-lb. Spectra suspension line, soft cutaway housings, red cutaway cable, round reserves, canopies made entirely of zero-porosity fabric, soft reserve handles, unreinforced miniring risers, belly bands, and old automatic openers. Select a rig and main that have been on the market for at least two years.
--Skydiver Magazine
http://www.skydivingmagazine.com/ques02.htm

Tandem Jumping
1991-1996:
670,707 jumps
8 fatalities (one for every 83,838 jumps).
--FAA 1999 NPRM
http://www.faa.gov/

1999-2002:
Worldwide: Less than one fatality for every 420,000 jumps made.
U.S. Only: One fatality for every 540,000 tandem jumps.
--Uninsured Relative Workshop.
http://www.relativeworkshop.com/home.html

Odds of death due to injury in several activities

The odds of dying from an injury (all causes) in 2002 were 1 in 1,755.
The lifetime odds of dying from an injury (all causes) for a person born in
2002 were 1 in 23.
--National Safety Council
http://www.nsc.org/lrs/statinfo/odds.htm

Odds of death due to injury, United States, 2002

Type # of Deaths One Year Odds Lifetime Odds
Pedestrian 6,091 47,273 612
Motorcycle rider 3,215 89,562 1,159
Car occupant 16,337 17,625 228
Animal rider 118 2,440,180 31,568
Drowning 413 697,194 9,019
Air and space transport accidents 653 440,951 5,704
Fall from ladder or scaffolding 406 709,215 9,175
Firearms discharge 762 377,876 4,888
Fireworks discharge 5 57,588,244 744,997
Struck by or against another person 26 11,074,662 143,269
Dog bites 18 15,966,734 206,944
Drowning and submersion 3,447 83,534 1,081
Choking 819 351,577 4,548
Electric transmission lines 109 2,641,663 34,174
Fire, smoke and flames 3,159 91,149 1,179
Hot tap-water 40 7,198,531 93,125
Snakes and lizards, venomous 3 95,980,407 1,241,661
Spiders, venomous 10 28,794,122 372,498
Hornets, wasps and bees 54 5,332,245 68,981
Heat: Exposure to excessive natural heat 350 822,689 10,643
Cold: Exposure to excessive natural cold 646 445,729 5,766
Lightning 66 4,362,746 56,439
Earthquake 31 9,288,426 120,161
Cataclysmic storm 63 4,570,496 59,127
Flood 9 31,993,469 413,887
Alcohol 355 811,102 10,493
Suicide by firearm 17,108 16,831 218
Assault by firearm 11,829 24,342 315
Complications, medical and surgical 2,843 101,281 1,310
--National Safety Council
http://www.nsc.org/lrs/statinfo/odds.htm

Injuries or death per participants, UK.

Sport Injuries per 1000 participants Remarks
Alpine Skiing 2.6  
Athletics 23.9  
Badminton 28.7  
Basketball 18.6 Figures from USA
Cricket 48.7  
Diving 0.4  
Football (Soccer) 64.4 29% of all sports injuries.
Golf 4.8  
Gymnastics 17.8  
Hockey 62.6  
Horse Riding Horse Riding Approx. 2.5 million riders in the UK
Weight Training 11.9  
Keep-fit 17.7  
Martial Arts/Boxing 45.9  
Motor Sport 29.7  
Mountain Sports 56.2 This is for every mountain sport
Rugby 95.7  
Sailing 51.7  
Squash 23.9  
Table Tennis 7.9  
Tennis 23.1  
Volleyball 3.7 Figures from USA
Caving 1.53 Includes injuries and fatalities

--Croydon Caving Club
http://www.croydoncavingclub.org.uk/Archive/Pelobates/073/S14.htm
"You are more likely to need hospital treatment from injury from the sink or toilet than caving"


For additional statistics and information on the parachute industry and the sport of skydiving, see the sites referenced above and

Military Parachutes.
http://www.natick.army.mil/search/index.htm Search for Parachutes.
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/mission/spacecraft_edl_parachute.html

World Skydiving Records. See
http://www.uspa.org/competition/records.htm

Skydiving and other aviation records
http://www.naa.aero/html/records/index.cfm?cmsid=48

Australian aviation statistics.
http://www.auf.asn.au/admin/statistics.html

American Demographics
http://www.adage.com/section.cms?sectionId=195

An independent, nonpartisan resource on trends in American public
opinion.
http://www.pollingreport.com/

Gallup Organization
http://www.Gallup.com/poll/

Bureau of Labor Statistics
http://www.bls.gov/home.htm

CIA Fact book download
http://www.cia.gov/cia/download2004.htm

FedStats
http://www.fedstats.gov/

State & County QuickFacts
http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/

United States Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau.
http://www.census.gov/

Bureau of Justice Statistics
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/

National Center for Education Statistics
http://nces.ed.gov/

National Center for Health Statistics
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/

Bureau of Transportation statistics
http://www.bts.gov/

National Archives and Records Administration
http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr

UK Statistics
http://www.statistics.gov.uk/default.asp


"There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics"
—Benjamin Disraeli, British Statesman.

Questions about the parachute/skydiving industry?
Contact Dan Poynter, D-454.
Author of
The Skydiver's Handbook
The Parachute Manual
+1-805-968-7277
DanPoynter@ParaPublishing.com
    http://ParaPublishing.com
© Dan Poynter, 2008